Hearn History of Writing and Printing collection

Title

Hearn History of Writing and Printing collection

Subject

Writing
History

Description

The collection consists of nineteen examples of writing and printing from cultures and languages around the globe. Items range from a Sumerian cuneiform tablet on clay dated 2034 BC to a Coptic Ethiopian scroll, an Asian wooden printing board, and medieval illuminated manuscripts on vellum.

Source

https://hanlib.sou.edu/speccoll/hearn.html

Publisher

Southern Oregon University. Library

Date

2034 BCE - 1799 CE

Rights

Public Domain: See http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
For fair use/educational reproduction, please provide the following credit: Courtesy of Southern Oregon University Hannon Library."

Format

illuminated manuscripts
writing tablets

Language

Coptic
English
Hieroglyphic
Japanese
Runic
Sanskrit
Sumerian

Type

Physical Object

Collection Items

Arabic illuminated manuscript
Two pages written in Arabic. One of the two features a painted image of three men on horses. Hand written with painting overlay.

Sanskrit with Indian Goddess
A page written in Sanskrit with a painting of an Indian Goddess.

The New England Primer
A child's primer, “The New England Primer” published by the American Tract Society, 150 Nassau Street, New York. Probably 18th Century.

Icelandic Saga page
A runic writing example from a book of Icelandic Sagas. Features a picture of a knight with a sword fighting a monster.

Book of Hours pages
Illuminated Manuscript . Written on vellum in a bold Gothic hand. This leaf is illuminated with elaborate marginal floriation, gold and colors…probably from Southern Netherlands in the late 15th century.”

Romaniepi illuminated manuscript
Illuminated Manuscript, possibly from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 15th Century-Medieval Period.

Nuremberg printing
An example of “Incunabula” a book printed before 1501, during the first 50 years of printing.” Printed on front and back.
This one: “Leaves from the Golden Legend” or “Lives of the Saints” by Jacob De Voregine.
Printed in Nuremberg by Anton…
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